treasure hunting drone quadcopter video platform

With renewed interest in hobby treasure hunting focused upon old or “lost” gold mines such as the lost Dutchman goldmine a video camera drone quadcopter platform sure seems like the ideal tool since looking with my eyes is much easier than looking with my feet. The word on the street is that supposedly someone found an old Spanish saddle bag from the 1800’s laying on the desert floor near superstition mountain at apache junction in Arizona by a historical area known as the massacre site. The story goes that at some point in the 1800’s a group of gold miners leaving the lost Dutchman goldmine were attacked and massacred by a band of Apache Indians who had no use for the gold they were carrying and so left it where it lay on the desert floor for all these years. The internet is buzzing about someone finding one of those saddlebags and opening it to discover that it was full of gold. Many people believe that gold miners buried treasure all through and around superstition mountain because the lost Dutchman gold mine produced more gold than anyone could carry. Research indicates that superstition mountain is a volcano that has erupted five times. Many scientists believe that gold can form in lava flows and that if sulfur is present in the equation eight times more gold might be produced. Legend has it that the gold vein in the lost Dutchman goldmine is two feet thick in places and that it runs all the way through superstition mountain. A quadcopter video drone would be the perfect treasure hunting tool to survey the mountain sides as well as scour the desert floor while sitting in the shade of a patio umbrella. The hill sides are also said to be abundant in primitive cliff dwellings from some ancient or possibly even prehistoric people. There is no telling what kind of artifacts may have been left behind. I think it would be interesting to conduct video drone surveys (climbing to old cliff dwellings can be dangerous) and make youtube videos with the quadcopter video drone. Article written by Steven School.

Click here to read customer testimonials about the phantom 3 quadcopter video camera drone platform

Nothing gold can stay, Robert Frost

Natures first green is gold,

her hardest hue to hold,

her early leaf’s a flower,

but only so an hour,

then leaf subsides to leaf,

so eden sank to grief,

so dawn goes down to day,

nothing gold can stay.

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Clues to the lost Dutchman goldmine

The story goes that in the fifteen hundreds professional gold miners (Peralta family) came to America from Spain. The Spanish conquistadores (conquerors) were documented throughout history as being experts in locating, mining and smelting gold and silver deposits which indicates that they were probably well educated in geology as well as metallurgy since various treasure legends often speak of lost or hidden mines wherein the Spanish prospected during the fifteen to seventeen hundreds and processed the ore smelting it into coins as well as bars usually made of either gold or silver. So during those times native American Indians such as the Apache and other tribes inhabited the land. When the Spaniards came upon the Arizona desert they recognized the volcano as being a mineral deposit and headed straight for those rock peaks which they later named the superstition mountains.  Old Snowbeard’s Gold

snowbeards gold

They began to create maps as well as landmarks on the local terrain which could be recorded in the land surveys. These symbols were said to be such things as arrows, triangles, hearts and a particular peak called weavers needle. These conquistadores of course would have had military or combat training and reportedly created under ground strong holds along their trails in the superstition mountain range which were believed to be stocked with racks of weapons as well as supplies. They were said to have located an enormous gold vein on the north side of the mountain at a height of approximately 1500 to 2000 feet. The purpose of their underground bunkers was that it gave them strongholds to quickly duck into in case of Indian attack while they were travelling to and from the mine. These underground houses were easily hidden and well defensible with primitive firearms since they had narrow concealable openings which served as the entrances. Some people believe that the mine was so rich that the Peralta’s had more gold than they could actually pack out even at their peak with 150 miners so they smelted gold bars and supposedly buried as many as 15000 of the gold bullion bars somewhere near weaver’s needle which was recorded as a landmark on their lost Dutchman gold mine treasure maps. Another interesting rumor is that at times miners would disguise the entrance of the mine when not in use (perhaps for the frozen winter seasons) with such things as rocks, wooden logs, or even brush. The story continues that the directions to the lost Dutchman gold mine by carving hearts into rocks and cactuses as well as leaving small hand carved rock hearts on the ground which most people walk over without ever even noticing. In this way the were able to mark the location of the lost Dutchman gold mine even when the entrance was concealed. Later in the 1800’s Jacob Waltz was said to have headed towards the superstition mountains as a prospector. After being attacked and fleeing on foot from the Apache Indian warriors he ended up finding himself in an empty encampment wherein he promptly helped himself to the food and provisions before falling asleep. The miners (descendants of the Peralta family) soon returned and woke him up to ask as to why he had been eating their food. After explaining the situation they befriended him and confided the story of their lost Dutchman gold mine, their various strong holds stocked with weapons hidden along the trail to the lost Dutchman gold mine, and the story of the 15000 gold bars which the Peralta family had buried somewhere near weavers needle. Reportedly being an opportunist, high grader, thief and murder, Jacob Waltz was said to have immediately drawn his gun and shot them dead thus taking over the mine as well as the gold and weapons cache. The high grader was said to have guarded the location of the lost Dutchman gold mine by literally shooting anyone that he encountered anywhere in or near the mountains, including on the trail which led back to town. The land is said to be a sacred Apache burial ground and many people do not enter out of respect for that while others traipse across the landscape picking up trinkets as souvenirs from the Indian burial grounds. The cliffs and mountain sides are said to be dotted with ancient cave dwellings from some primitive and long forgotten people of another time. Some people believe that the gold vein runs all the way through the volcanic mountain and that Jacob Waltz had found both ends of it which he concealed. The winters in the superstition mountains are said to be very cold and below freezing at times with ice and snow while the dry heat of summer reaches soaring temperatures with minimal or nonexistent supply of drinkable water. Legend has it that many people have died in the superstition mountains while looking for lost Apache gold mines from dehydration, accidents, and even foul play. Droppings in the desert indicate the presence of wild animals which may be predators. Rattle snakes are said to inhabit the area as well so caution and a good pair of boots might be wise. excavations can be frowned upon however picture taking is said to be ok. Rumor through the grape vine indicate that some who have approached to closely to the mine entrance have encountered militarized agents and even helicopters who remotely surveil the terrain. Their have been stories of old Spanish saddle bags full of gold being found laying around on the desert floor as remnants from miners who did not survive the encounters which the Apache Indians who had no use for gold and so left it where it fell after their massacres which may have been fueled by a need to survive in the rugged terrain by taking food, water, clothing, horses, mules, and weapons from those whom they had scalped. Gold is said to be formed in volcanic lava flows when sulfur and iron are present in the mineral matrix along with other elements however ancient alchemists believed that it also grows within the caverns of the earth as a metallic crystal through the action of natures rain cycle being water coupled with the four seasons.

Article written by Steven School. Author of The Philosopher’s Stone Book.

the-philosophers-stone

The lost treasure of the superstition mountains

East of Phoenix Arizona near Apache Junction lies the superstition mountains. Legend has it that in the 1850’s a member of the Peralta family fled into the area while on the run. The story of Superstition Mountain and the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine

images of the superstion mountains

As the story goes the journey began in the direction of a prominent landmark called weaver’s needle. While trekking through the area he supposedly found a rich gold deposit which he began to mine before bringing back others to help.

lost dutchman mine cluesThe bible on the lost dutchman gold mine

Jacob Waltz 1810-1891 was said to have crossed paths with those who knew about the mine and they supposedly bragged the whole story to him before he promptly drew his gun and shot them dead. Jacob Waltz was said to have taken over the mine becoming very rich and concealing its location by killing all who followed him into the mountains or inadvertently crossed his path as he travelled back and forth from the secret location.

Article written by Steven School.

The story of Superstition mountain and the lost Dutchman gold mine

the story of superstition mountain and the lost dutchman gold minethe lost dutchman gold mine and jacob waltz

The bible on the lost dutchman gold mine and Jacob Waltz

Peg leg Smith lost gold mine Colorado

 

Thomas L Smith 1801-1866 who was perhaps better known as “peg leg smith” trapped beaver, sold furs, and owned a trading post in Idaho along the Oregon trail where he sold horses. In 1827 he earned his nickname pegleg because he was struck by an arrow leading to amputation of the limb as well as the fabrication of a wooden “peg leg” which helped him to walk again.

peg leg smith monument

Legend says that pegleg smith was travelling down the Colorado river at some point between 1820 and 1840 on his way to Los Angeles in southern California. As he trekked across the Colorado desert he encountered an area which he described by the visible landscape as “three buttes”. He began collecting black rocks which he thought to be copper but rumor has it that upon arrival in Los Angeles the nuggets were assayed to reveal gold. The legend of pegleg smith and the black gold nuggets has sparked many treasure hunters to search for pegleg smith’s lost gold mine in the area of the three buttes which is said to be second only to the lost Dutchman gold mine. The story goes that pegleg smith organized at least two search parties to go back and look for the three buttes gold deposit in the Colorado desert with no success.

I’m sure many men have wished they could trap beaver like old pegleg smith.

Article written by Steven School.

Lost Gold and Silver Mines of the Southwest Paperback – October 10, 1996

lost gold mine stories